As things continue to heat up on the streets of Somerville, the team here at Elliot’s House is always thinking of how the heat affects our canine companions. One of the most stylish ways for your pup to beat the heat is with a summer cut. However, summer cuts aren’t the same for every pup and there are some important things to consider before you schedule a summer cut or attempt one on your own. This blog post will explore the do’s and don’ts of summer cuts and some general information about dog grooming.

Not all dog’s coats are the same or even relatively similar. Many breeds have double coats, thick coats or other special types of hair/fur that they have adapted over time for various reasons. As the summer months begin to heat up, you would think that shaving down thicker coats and giving the shortest trims possible would be the best way to keep your pup cool. That isn’t the case. For example, dogs with fur have two different parts to their coat. These parts are the guard coat and the undercoat. The guard coat is the rough, thick outer layer that is easiest to see and it protects the dog’s skin from extreme weather conditions. The undercoat is the soft, fluffy fur that is located under the guard coat and it helps to keep their bodies insulated during the summer and winter. The guard coat should not be shaved off, as the fur provides pups with the proper insulation they need to stay cool during the summer months. While humans would hate to have multiple layers in the scorching heat, your pups fur coat actually provides them with heat relief. Robbing your pup of his natural cooling system by shaving them down can lead to discomfort, overheating, and other serious dangers like sunburn or skin cancer.

All this being said, don’t be afraid to give your pup a summer cut! These usually involve trimming away the necessary long hair from their guard coat to make the heat more manageable. It is best to allow a professional groomer to perform the haircutting, and never shave down to the skin or attempt a hair cut yourself with scissors.  Dogs with thick coats naturally shed so they typically get lighter coats on their own in the summer. Be mindful of grooming hygiene and remember to brush your dog’s fur regularly and bathe them frequently. This is because clean, brushed fur typically allows for better air circulation, which will keep your pup cool.

When it comes to cutting never underestimate the damage an improper haircut can have on your dogs’ coat. In general, the more fur that is clipped, especially with older dogs, the less likely the guard coat is to grow back in a healthy manner.  The undercoat will typically grow back as expected, but the guard coat may grow back uneven, which will leave your pup with a bit of a scruffy and bedraggled appearance.  Clipping fur doesn’t really help with clipping or shedding, but proper maintenance and brushing does help. A competent groomer will know the difference between fur and hair and should be able to assist you in choosing the right cut for your pup. Our groomers here at Elliot’s House in Somerville are always more than happy to help if you have any questions about your pup’s summer cut!

Did your pup get a fancy new haircut for summer? Do you have any haircut horror stories? Let us know on social media!

 

 

 

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This